Talking machine repair papers Victrola how-to-fix items

In: Repair

1 Mar 2010

Talking machine repair papers Victrola how-to-fix items

Talking machine repair papers Victrola how-to-fix items

“HOW TO MAINTAIN A VICTROLA” booklet, PLUS Orthophonic Victrola Guide Booklet (from 1926), PLUS “Setting Up a Victrola” instruction manual (Spring Motor Type), PLUS other Victrola literature–THIS IS A PACKAGE deal, with several different items! **THESE ARE MODERN COPIES, NOT ORIGINALS.** I’ve sold the same package to many Victrola dealers and collectors. Every person has said “THANKS FOR THE GREAT INFO!” (check my ebay feedback!). You obviously don’t get original copies in this package deal (they are too rare!). You get carefully duplicated reproductions done on digital equipment. You get misc. papers and duplicated booklets (stapled) that you can have out while you do repairs on your rare machines. You get about two dozen sheets (some in the form of stapled booklets). See visuals below for SOME of what you get in this package deal. IDEAL for new collectors who want INFORMATION on how to maintain a phonograph. Add $1.73 FOR POSTAGE. THAT IS THE ACTUAL POSTAGE COST (if rates may have gone up–I’ll cover the difference). The above visual is from a Victrola repair/maintenance booklet put out by the Victor Talking Machine Company, and you need a copy if you wish your own machine to perform at its peak! In the Orthophonic booklet that you also get, you will find over 20 visuals covering the unique “re-enterant horn,” proper lubrication (an oiling diagram!), the lid support knob (with air vent), inserting the needle into the Orthophonic soundbox, lowering the soundbox, lifting the motor out, the swing tube, adjusting the tube, mounting the turntable. It explains how the automatic brake is triggered by eccentric groove discs. It explains how to take care of records. A section covers the tungs-tone stylus or needle. A section discusses how to loosen lock nuts to prevent lids closing with a bumping sound. It explains how to insert a small wire into the lid support’s air vent to remove dirt that may be clogging the vent. It explains how to wind the motor down a few times after lubrication “to assure free working of all parts and re-distribution of lubricant.” It talks about mounting the soundbox in the correct manner onto the soundbox crook. YOU GET ANOTHER BOOKLET IN THIS PACKAGE DEAL: Instructions for Repairing the Victor Motors and Exhibition Sound Box The portable machine above is a Victrola 50. The “-ola” was used by the company for models with interior or hidden horns. WITH THIS PACKAGE DEAL YOU GET THE BOOKLET THAT SOME VISUALS ABOVE ARE TAKEN FROM: 8-page booklet from 1914! Carefully duplicated–same format as original! Items discussed include oiling the barrel arbor at its bearing in the top plate, governor springs (forced out of position on their seats?), governor sleeve binding on the governor spindle, escutcheon plate, putting oil in the sleeve on the governor friction disc, checking that thrust balls are in both governor bearings, the brake leather (pulled out a little?), speed indicator (it is not a speed regulator–there is a difference!), lubricating the governor friction leather, oiling the indicator bearings, lowering the motor into place, having the winding key aligned properly with the winding shaft, automatic brake yoke, caps in the spring barrels, examining the barrel arbor bearings, replacing a spring, and so on. AND THERE ARE MORE MISC. PAPERS DUPLICATING RARE INFO ISSUED BY THE VICTOR TALKING MACHINE COMPANY! ORIGINALS ARE SUPER SCARE. THESE DUPLICATIONS SHOULD SATISFY NEW COLLECTORS WHO WANT INFORMATION ON HOW TO MAINTAIN MACHINES. Victor had many other competitors–Columbia, Brunswick, Sonora, Delpheon, Busy Bee, Pathe, Cheney, Kalamazoo. I will soon identify which companies put out (along with Victor) first-rate machines, and which put out second- and third-rate machines. For now, I recommend that you avoid cabinet machines made by obscure manufacturers unless price is irresistible. I avoid cabinet machines made by obscure manufacturers since sound is poor. The big companies held the patents for technology that produced the best sound. Also, broken or missing parts from oddball machines are difficult to replace. Do you have questions about your machine? CHANCES ARE GOOD THAT YOUR QUESTION WILL BE ANSWERED IN THE PACKAGE OF MATERIAL. Victor had many other competitors–Columbia, Brunswick, Sonora, Delpheon, Busy Bee, Pathe, Cheney, Kalamazoo. A few companies put out (along with Victor) first-rate machines, and others put out second- and third-rate machines. (Buying machines? I recommend that you avoid cabinet machines made by obscure manufacturers unless price is irresistible. I avoid cabinet machines made by obscure manufacturers since sound is poor. The big companies held the patents for technology that produced the best sound. Also, broken or missing parts from oddball machines are difficult to replace.) If you follow all steps in the papers included in this package deal of duplicated materials, you will be impressed by what you hear from your own machine. Do you have a question? Send email to me via ebay. These are RARE items duplicated on MODERN digital equipment (these are duplications, digital xeroxed–in other words, you don’t get “originals” from 1910-1928). How do I gain access to the spring motor? Postage = add $1.73

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Video for Columbia


Columbia

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